Tag Archives: Vernonia Library

New Computer and Internet Use Policy at the Library

On Monday, March 16, 2015, City Council approved the Computer and Internet Use Policy now in effect at the library.  The policy was drafted by the Library Director, Shannon Romtvedt, based on policies used at other libraries and a great deal of input and research from the Library Board.

One rule that is a significant change from the previous policy is stated here:

“Children under 10 years of age must be directly supervised by a parent/legal guardian or adult caregiver when using the computer.  Parents/legal guardians who wish to restrict computer access for a minor (age 17 or younger) may do so at any time by requesting a Minor Internet Access Restriction form.”

The previous policy required written parental permission for minors to use the computer.  Children under the age of 13 needed direct parental supervision to use the Internet.  Reasoning for the change is as follows:

1) Many libraries are revising their Internet Policy and are no longer requiring parental permission for minors. Sandy Public Library made the change in November 2014, stating that “A lot of libraries made the decision (to require formal parent permission) when the Internet was very new.” Read More

Meet New Library Director Shannon Romtvedt

MeetLibrarianShannonRomtvedt-webShannon Romtvedt is the new Director at the Vernonia Library.  Romtvedt was a highly qualified candidate who was selected for the position by City staff in November.

Romtvedt, who lives outside Vernonia off Keasey Road with her young family, brings a professional education and experience in several other library systems.  She says she is excited by the opportunity to work in her own hometown.

“One of my favorite things to hear as a librarian is:  ‘I didn’t know where to start with this question, so I came to the library,’” said Romtvedt.

Romtvedt says she was interested in working in libraries from a young age.  She grew up in West Salem, OR and enjoyed spending time at the local branch of her local library.  “It was not much  bigger than this Vernonia Library and I spent a lot of time there,” remembers Romtvedt.  “As a kid I envisioned being the Librarian there.”

Romtvedt did end up volunteering at her local library as a high school student, and enjoyed straightening the children’s area and creating displays.  “I had a lot of fun with that,” she says.

Romtvedt attended George Fox University, majoring in Writing and Literature, graduating in 2005.  While at George Fox Romtvedt did a work/study program at the university library.  She also met her soon to be husband Brady Romtvedt at George Fox.  Following graduation they moved together to Texas where Brady worked on a Master’s Degree in Philosophy from Baylor University. Read More

Local Author Speaks to Book Club

DianaPeach-webLocal author Diana Peach met with the Vernonia Library Book Club on Monday, July 28 at the Vernonia Library.

Peach, who publishes her books under the name D. Wallace Peach, spoke with the group for over an hour.  Peach discussed her motivation for writing, her writing style, and the difficulties of becoming a published author.

Peach recently released her third book through Mockingbird Lane Press, titled ‘Sunwielder.’  Her first book, titled ‘Myths of the Mirror’ was published in 2013.  Peach followed that by publishing “The Melding of Aeris,’ also in 2013.

A prolific writer, Peach’s stories are in the fantasy genre and are set in imaginatively created  worlds.  Her highly original plots include themes that can be interpreted as relating to current day issues; environmental destruction, science gone wild, and the ethical  treatment of other species are subject matter that feature prominently in Peach’s stories.  “It’s really interesting what different people take from books and what they see as relevant,” says Peach.  “I feel like there are themes in all my books that are relevant to our lives.  That’s  part of what makes them compelling for me to write.  I feel like I’m writing about things that matter, even though it’s fantasy.”

Peach also explores other personal issues like the power of choices and how our choices define our lives, love relationships, vanity, and the idea that happiness cannot be bought. Read More

There’s A Lot to Check Out at the Vernonia Library

Library1-webMany local citizens use and enjoy the Vernonia Public Library on a regular basis.  We check out books and videos, use the computers to access the internet and maybe attend a special program once in a while.

But there is a lot more going on at your Library than you might realize, much of it volunteer driven.

Library Director Jennifer Moloney is pleased with the numerous opportunities the Vernonia Library provides and about the support she has been receiving from community members and organizations.

“We like to have as many programs as possible here,” says Moloney.  “In a small community like this, that is what the Library needs to be.  Anything culturally relevant that we can provide for the community, especially programs at no charge, is good.  The Library is far more than just a building with books anymore.” Read More

On the Shelves: What’s Happening at the Vernonia Library

Throughout the country, most children are starting a new academic year. Teachers are sending out their lists of required readings, and parents are beginning to gather books. In some cases, classics like “The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn,” “The Catcher in the Rye,” and “To Kill a Mocking Bird,” may not be included in curriculum or available in the school library due to challenges made by parents or administrators.

Since 1990, the American Library Association’s (ALA) Office for Intellectual Freedom (OIF) has recorded more than 10,000 book challenges, including 513 in 2008. A challenge is a formal, written complaint requesting a book be removed from library shelves or school curriculum. About three out of four of all challenges are to material in schools or school libraries, and one in four are to material in public libraries. OIF estimates that less than one-quarter of challenges are reported and recorded.

It is thanks to the commitment of librarians, teachers, parents, and students that most challenges are unsuccessful and reading materials like “I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings,” “Slaughterhouse Five,” the Harry Potter series, and Phyllis Reynolds Naylor’s Alice series, remain available.

The most challenged and/or restricted reading materials have been books for children.  However, challenges are not simply an expression of a point of view; on the contrary, they are an attempt to remove materials from public use, thereby restricting the access of others. Even if the motivation to ban or challenge a book is well intentioned, the outcome is detrimental. Censorship denies our freedom as individuals to choose and think for ourselves. For children, decisions about what books to read should be made by the people who know them best—their parents! Read More

“Slow Learners: Two hundred Years of Unheeded Warnings”

The Vernonia Library was host on April 20, 2013 to an interesting conversation about warning signs of impending doom that the leaders and general population of our country and planet are continuing to ignore.

“Slow Learners: Two hundred Years of Unheeded Warnings” was the  program facilitated by Dr. Richard  Clinton, professor emeritus of political science at Oregon State University.  The program was part of the Conversation Project through  Oregon Humanities.

Oregon Humanities offers free programs that engage communities in thoughtful, challenging conversations about ideas critical to our daily lives and our state’s future.

Dr. Clinton used a series of historic quotes from authors, historians, scientists and poets to stimulate conversation with the small audience in attendance.  Clinton raised questions about overpopulation and the earths ability to sustain continual growth,  (“Adapt or perish, now as ever, is nature’s inexorable imperative.” – H.G. Wells),   our continued reliance on technology to solve our problems, (“Men have become the tools of their tools.” – Henry David Thoreau), the unwillingness of the United States to take seriously the threat of global warming, the role of money and greed in our political decision making, the continuing disparity between  the rich and the poor, and how corporations and the rich control our economy and governments, (“An attitude to life which seeks fulfillment in the single minded pursuit of wealth, in short materialism, does not fit  into this world, because it contains within itself  no limiting principle, while the environment in which  it is placed is strictly limited.” – E.F. Schumacher)

Clinton proposed that our population has become cynical (“We are wondering between two worlds, one dead, the other powerless to be born.” – Matthew Arnold, 1885) about our ability to influence our government, our economy, and our environment.  “We’ve had all kinds of warnings, but we don’t pay attention, we don’t act,” said Clinton.

Clinton noted that science  overwhelmingly shows that global warming is real and that 98% of scientists worldwide agree that  human caused climate change is occurring.  Clinton blames what he calls “astroturf organizations” (as opposed to grassroots organizations), which have been created by the fossil fuel companies that pay scientists to convince Americans that the threat is not real.  He also referenced a film, “Chasing Ice” that documents evidence of climate change.

Clinton provided a reference list for his audience and several times referenced  Herman Daly, author of “Economics, Ecology, Ethics, Essays Towards a Steady-State Economy.”  Clinton attended Vanderbilt University with Daly, who portends that there is no need for continued growth in population and the economy for there  to be continued moral, mental and social progress.  Daly suggests a stationary condition of capital and population, a “Steady-State Economy.” “The important  issue of the steady state will be distribution, not production, says Daly.”  Clinton says the decision about how to distribute resources more equitably and fairly is a moral issue.

Clinton suggests that by working together, questioning our culture and talking about the issues he has raised, the populous has the ability to find the wisdom to proceed.  “These people have been talking about a revolution in the way we think about our world,” says Clinton.  “It’s up to us to finally do something about it.”

Library Conversation Explores Unheeded Warnings

On April 20, 2013, at 4:00 PM the Vernonia Public Library presents “Slow Learners:  Two Hundred Years of Unheeded Warnings,” a free conversation with Oregon State University professor emeritus Richard Clinton.  This program is hosted by Friends of the Vernonia Public Library and Vernonia Library Board and sponsored by Oregon Humanities.

Cogent, compelling warnings about exponential population growth, misplaced faith in technology to solve our problems, that greed and envy are treacherous underpinnings for an economic system – have been ignored for more than two centuries.  These warnings have come from some of the best minds of their times and have often been endorsed by other respected scientists and thinkers, yet their influence on public policy and individual behavior has been negligible. Read More

Library Conversation Explores Unheeded Warnings

Cogent, compelling warnings about exponential population growth, misplaced faith in technology to solve our problems, that greed and envy are treacherous underpinnings for an economic system – have been ignored for more than two centuries.  These warnings have come from some of the best minds of their times and have often been endorsed by other respected scientists and thinkers, yet their influence on public policy and individual behavior has been negligible.

This is the focus of “Slow Learners:  Two Hundred Years of Unheeded Warnings,” a free conversation with Oregon State University professor emeritus Richard Clinton on April 20, 2013, at 4:00 PM at the Vernonia Public Library.  This program is hosted by Friends of the Vernonia Public Library and Vernonia Library Board and sponsored by Oregon Humanities. Read More

On the Shelves

Stamps, stamps, stamps!  The  latest program being initiated at the Vernonia Public Library is the Vernonia Stamp Club.  This program will reach out to the ‘young’ and ‘not as young’ alike.  The club will meet at the library the first Thursday of the month starting in April from 4:30-5:30 PM.  The first meeting is April 4th.

OntheShelvesStampsWhether you are a long time collector or just interested in discovering the fun of stamp collecting, come join Grant Williams at the first meeting.  All ages are welcome.  Learn how to identify and care for postage stamps and start building a lifelong hobby that will increase your knowledge of world countries, leaders, and important events and places.  Bring in a collection for evaluation or just show up to see what it’s all about.

Thousands of free stamps are waiting to be discovered and find a new home.

On the Shelves: What’s Happening at the Vernonia Library

Please welcome Evelyn Banko to the Vernonia Public Library Saturday, March 9 at 4:00 PM

Evelyn Diamont was born January 21, 1936 in Vienna, Austria. Her father, Joseph, was an engineer and her mother, Frieda, was a housewife. In March of 1938, the Nazi’s marched into Austria and annexed it as part of Germany. Hitler’s persecution and murder of Jews was rampant in Vienna and after being tipped off that Joseph was to be deported within twenty-four hours, Joseph gathered then two year old Evie and Frieda and fled to Riga, Latvia. Read More